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Contender eSports Gaming Center (Lubbock) celebrates first anniversary

LUBBOCK, Texas Jul 17, 2021 / 09:10 AM CDT

Contender eSports Gaming Center is excited to announce the celebration of its one-year anniversary, Saturday, July 17th. The celebration will take place all day, with center hours being from 11:00 AM to 2:00 AM. No purchase is necessary to attend.

All Contender eSports members will get to play for free the entire day. Twister Texas Hub City food truck will be on site from 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM and Llano Cubano’s food truck will be present from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM. Community partners such as Lubbock-Con, Hub City Outreach Center and Extra Life will also be present. There will be giveaways throughout the day consisting of Monster Xbox controllers, coolers, shirts, and much more.

Several tournaments will take place during the event including a Minecraft Build Contest at 12:00 PM, Among Us at 2:00 PM, Madden21 at 4:00 PM, and Rocket League 2v2 at 6:00 PM. If anyone wants to play in multiple tournaments they will only pay the venue fee once. Early registrations are welcome and encouraged at contenderesports.com/lbkevents.

In addition to Saturday’s festivities, Friday evening there will be a Fortnite Solos tournament and a VR set up available for play, both starting at 6:00 PM. Super Smash Bros Ultimate Weekly tournament will be at 6:00 PM on Sunday.

Contender eSports is a LAN gaming center available to casual and competitive gamers of all ages. Everyone is welcome to experience a fun, family friendly atmosphere with 39 professional gaming PCs, 14 Xbox’s, 8 Nintendo Switch’s, and 2 PS5’s. Party room reservations are available along with multiple membership options, lock-ins, game nights, tournaments and other events.

Contender eSports is located at 4930 S. Loop 289 Suite 208 and can be reached at 806-853-7811, [email protected] or lubbockesports.com.

Interested in finding out more about being a part of our growing franchise? Let us know here: Is the Esports Business Right For Me?

For more information about Contender eSports, check out our FAQ

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What’s New at Contender eSports?

What’s New at Contender eSports?

1. New Locations Opening SOON: Miami, OK (Buffalo Run Casino), Charleston, SC, Hudson Valley, NY and Emerald Coast, FL.

2. Selling out 2 National Tournaments — August 27-29, Call of Duty & Rainbow 6 in Cary, NC — September 18-19, Valorant in Lubbock, TX.

3. Never go a day without employees…how? Socializing, gaming, selling, and chilling all while getting paid attracts a lot of people to work….

Still interested in finding out more about being a part of our growing franchise? Let us know here: Is the Esports Business Right For Me?

 

For more information about Contender eSports, check out our FAQ

Springfield hosts one of the largest eSports events in the country

Springfield hosts one of the largest eSports events in the country

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. — Springfield is hosting the biggest Call of Duty Tournament in the country and the first day of the event starts tonight.

Call of Duty is a first-person combat video game franchise published by Activision. The first game was released in 2003, and creators first focused the games in a World War II setting. Over time, the series has seen games set amid the Cold War, futuristic worlds, and outer space.

eSports continues to become more popular in the country, and one study says the U.S. is expected to make $300 million in eSports revenue this year. That number is much larger when you look at it on a global scale with more than $1 billion in revenue.

Revenue used to be much lower since streaming platforms weren’t as popular a decade ago. Now you can see people steam daily and even broadcast station like CBS has aired eSports tournaments.

More than 150 nationally ranked players will be here in Springfield to compete in the three-day event which has a $5,000 prize pool.

The event will be held at Contender eSports in Springfield.

 

By KOLR 10 News
Christina Randall, David Chasanov
June 25, 2021
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For more information about Contender eSports, check out our FAQ

Virtual schooling options available at Lubbock gaming facility

Virtual schooling options available at Lubbock gaming facility

LUBBOCK, Texas — Contender eSports in Lubbock said Wednesday it would share their resources with students in the community with an online school location for families who may not be ready to send their children back to a busy school just yet.

The business opened up in July as a video game facility. With the landscape of education quickly changing, management decided they could use their facility to help out the community.

Contender eSports Lubbock

“When we saw there might be a need in the community for virtual schooling locations, we immediately were like, yes, let’s jump in there and see what we can do to help,” said owner Rachel Kiwior.

Management explained the program could serve as a possible solution for parents who may not be ready to send their children back to a busy school who also may not have the necessary resources or time to keep them focused at home.

“If you’re a parent, maybe you’re working from home, it’s hard to do your work and teach your child throughout the day, ” said Kiwior. “We’ve got someone here to help all day. If they have any questions, we’ve got a dedicated person to help them with their schooling.”

The facility is available for students in grades three through 12 and would be open during regular school hours, but with flexible pick up and drop off times for parents.

The business would go about its regular business for gamers throughout the day and are currently flexible with how many students they would take in, the maximum being 45.

Students who have opted for virtual learning have been provided Chromebooks by their prospective school districts. Contender eSports said students would use those to do all of their school work but would have opportunities to use the desktop computers and gaming systems during breaks.

“We have a set structure, so they’re going to be doing school work, and we have worked in breaks during that time as well so that they can have a little bit of fun,” said Kiwior. “They will bring their Chromebooks here, they will connect to our Wi-Fi, it’s high speed, so they should have any connection problems.”

Lubbock ISD Assistant Superintended Misty Rieber said parents who opt for online learning should be aware of what it means to sign up for virtual school.

“They’re making a commitment to a full day of learning, ” Rieber said. “The full schedule, the rigor, the same grading system, the same grading as our students and the same face to face instruction.”

Contender eSports said they hope their program would help to fill the gap for parents who may not be ready to make that much of a commitment, even though, they are not ready to send their children to school.

“They’re going to be around the same people every day but at a safe distance, and we will make everything clean and safe for you,” said Kiwior. “We do have a policy that everyone should be wearing a mask, so we require all of our employees to have a mask on. We’re trying to keep a safe environment – we clean after every single customer everything is wiped down.”

As an employee at Texas Tech’s College of Engineering, Kiwior explained it is important for all customers to follow the governor’s orders and wear masks and maintain social distance.

In addition to having a tutor available, students would have the opportunity to learn other skills while they are attending the program.

“We have a program where they can learn to code, they can actually create their own app and their own game, so hopefully after this experience, they can take that with them,” said Kiwior.

The schedule would also be flexible. Parents could choose to send their children for five days a week, or three days (Monday, Wednesday and Friday) or two days (Tuesday and Thursday).

The price of the program is $30 a day per student, but management said they would work with each individual and hope to offer scholarships to make the program affordable for everyone.

For more information on how to sign up, visit their website.

By KOLR 10 News
Aug 2020
View Original Article

For more information about Contender eSports, check out our FAQ

Video game approved by the FDA to help children with ADHD

Video game approved by the FDA to help children with ADHD

The Food and Drug Administration has approved the first video game as a type of therapy for any condition.

Endeavor Rx, the video game, is designed to help with sensory and motor tasks and improve cognitive skills.

Michael Chapman works at Contender E-Sports here in Springfield, he says he’s happy video games are being seen in a better light.

Contender eSports Springfield

“We’ve been saying at Contender for a long time that gaming has been a positive force for kids and adults,” said Chapman. “We love the communities we see here when people come in, when they come together. We’ve always seen the social aspects. It’s great to see a more scientific approach and some more benefits proven. Even above and beyond what we’ve always said what’s great about video games and video game culture.”

The FDA also says the game can help children with attention function.

By KOLR 10 News
June 2020
View Original Article

For more information about Contender eSports, check out our FAQ

Contender eSports Lubbock Opening Soon!

Contender Esports opening in Lubbock in the next couple of weeks

LUBBOCK, Texas – Calling all gamers, a new gaming center, Contender Esports is opening in Lubbock in about two weeks. They will have about 55 stations and two party rooms for all your video gaming needs. They will have games for Xbox, PC, and Switch.

Contender eSports Springfield

By Kelsee Pitman
June 2, 2020
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For more information about Contender eSports, check out our FAQ

Interview: What is Contender eSports?

Corey Riggs of MC22 “From the Studio” interviews Founder and CEO of Contender eSports, Brett Payne.

What are eSports? What is Contender eSports? True or False: “No one is going to pay you to play video games and you can’t go to college on a video game scholarship”. Learn the answers to these and much more in this video.

Contender eSports Springfield


May 30, 2020
Corey Riggs
https://twitter.com/CoreyRiggsTV
https://twitter.com/fromthestudio22

For more information about Contender eSports, check out our FAQ

In the Quarantine Age, an indoor sport seizes center stage

Four men appeared on my television at 2 p.m. in neat rectangles. The backgrounds varied. Barren white walls in one, a few frames in another. A window, some furniture. They all had headsets. One wore a burgundy suit and tie. The others went more casual in the confines of their homes.
::

The gathering resembled the Zoom video chats we have staged with coworkers and friends since the coronavirus outbreak shut down pretty much everything. But this setting was different than our virtual happy hours and mundane meetings.

It was the broadcast for the League of Legends Championship Series (LCS). League of Legends, a multiple-player online battle arena game developed by Riot Games and released in 2009, is the most popular esports title in the world with up to eight million gamers logging on daily to play on their computers. The LCS, which was created in 2012, is the game’s highest level of competition in North America.

It is also one of the few remaining live entertainment options afloat during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Thousands were concurrently watching the stream, presented by a large mainstream advertiser, State Farm, on Twitch and YouTube. It was back online after a one-week hiatus, pushing forward when much of society had skidded to a halt. The matches, regularly held in West Los Angeles in front of a few hundred fans, were staged remotely.

“We feel like we’re weathering the storm pretty well,” LCS commissioner Chris Greeley said, “but obviously, as it is for everyone, it’s still a storm.”

I’m a casual gamer. Stick and ball sports were my preference growing up, though in recent years my time has been limited to playing shooters online with friends. It’s a social activity, and one of the few available since COVID-19 arrived. After downloading the game on my laptop, I tried following along with the ad hoc broadcast, curious and confused. I didn’t know the rules or the point of the game but, holed up in my apartment, I welcomed the live competition. The pickings have never been slimmer on a Saturday afternoon.

This should be one of the most exciting periods on the sports calendar. The NCAA Tournament going mad, the start of baseball season, battles for playoff seeding in the NBA, the Masters right around the next magnolia bush, even the XFL for a football fix if mock NFL drafts didn’t suffice.

But those events were postponed for the foreseeable future, if not canceled completely, leaving playing video games — and watching others play them — as two of the limited choices left to sate our social and entertainment thirst. As stadiums and arenas go silent, there is a growing din in a corner of the landscape that until now has largely been drowned out by more traditional, mainstream sports.

It’s coming from the more than 150 million Americans who identify as gamers, and not just the influencers who have become wealthy stars: Ninja, PewDiePie, PrestonPlayz, Markiplier. It’s NBA stars challenging each to other to Call of Duty; teens playing Fortnite at 3 a.m. on indefinite leave from school; 9-to-5 workers at home sneaking in FIFA games between Zoom meetings. It’s me.

Esports were built for the quarantine culture because, to some degree, isolation always has been a part of its DNA. And with hundreds of millions now shut-in for the time being, an already robust community senses an opportunity.

This could be esports’ moment.

“It is an absolutely terrible thing that’s happening around the world,” Ryan Friedman said. “Obviously, it’s a huge net negative, but with the cancellation of traditional sports, a lot of people who would have never given esports a chance are going to start at least looking into it and that’s a good opportunity for esports to draw in a bunch of new viewers.”

Friedman is the chief of staff of Dignitas, an organization with teams in various esports acquired by the Philadelphia 76ers in 2016. He is also the younger brother of Andrew Friedman, the Dodgers’ president of baseball operations. While Andrew’s team sat idle on opening day last week, wondering if Major League Baseball would have a 2020 season, Ryan’s franchise, one of the 10 in the LCS, stayed busy.

Esports — broadly defined as professional competition using video games — had several major events on the calendar canceled, but most entities have been able to continue competition knowing an amplified audience is available. Evidence of the opportunity is found on Twitch, the go-to streaming platform for casual and professional gaming.

“With the cancellation of traditional sports, a lot of people who would have never given esports a chance are going to start at least looking”. Ryan Freidman, Brother of Dodgers President Andrew Friedman.

People are streaming and watching streams more than ever since the outbreak began taking hold, according to TwitchTracker.com and SullyGnome.com, which monitor Twitch audiences. The platform has set all-time highs this month in peak daily active users (22.7 million), average concurrent viewers (1.6 million), and number of streamers (65,000).

“In esports, the show can go on,” esports lawyer Bryce Blum said. “We can transition back to our roots.”

The increase has not, however, been as uniform for conventional esports events. A few esports have seen instant growth in viewers, such as Rocket League and the ESL Pro League, a 24-team Counter-Strike: Global Offensive competition that recently enjoyed its most-watched broadcast day in history. Conversely, League of Legends has experienced a year-over-year jump of around 20,000 viewers on Twitch this month but has seen a dip since the LCS opened its spring season to great fervor in late January.

The industry is nascent but not new with consumers around the world. Money has flooded into the space over the last decade to fuel a booming enterprise that has eclipsed $1 billion globally. And plenty of that capital has been supplied by leaders in traditional sports.

In 2016, Dodgers co-owner Peter Guber and Ted Leonsis, owner of the NBA’s Washington Wizards and NHL’s Washington Capitals, led a group that bought controlling interest in Team Liquid, recognized as the most successful esports organization in history. Dan Gilbert, owner of the NBA’s Cleveland Cavaliers, invested in an organization and the Golden State Warriors founded one in 2017.

A member of Team OOB in action during the League of Legends World Finals at the Girl Gamer Esports Festival in Dubai in February.
A fan watches the final match of the 2018 League of Legends World Championship in South Korea.

The infusion accelerated the industry’s expansion. Live competitions with massive audiences became common. Events filled Staples Center and Madison Square Garden. Millions of dollars have been awarded to players in different games, and several players boast career earnings of more than $1 million.

In recent weeks, traditional sports entities with esports partnerships have turned to the virtual world after their schedules were abruptly detonated. Leonsis’ Monumental Sports and Entertainment Group recently began airing one-hour video game simulations of previously scheduled Wizards and Capitals games on NBC Sports Washington. Formula 1 ran a race with professional drivers and gamers that aired on Twitch. On Friday, MLB held a tournament with four major leaguers on MLB: The Show 20 and steamed it on different platforms.

NASCAR aired a virtual version of the Dixie Vodka 150 at Homestead-Miami Speedway on FOX two Sundays ago with the participants using racing simulators remotely. The real-life NASCAR racers who participated were not rookies to the platform — racers have used virtual simulators as practice tools for the real thing for years. The results were proof.

Denny Hamlin, a three-time Daytona 500 winner, edged out retired driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. for the win in a $40,000 iRacing rig at his house, barefoot with his daughter cheering behind him. NASCAR Hall of Famer Jeff Gordon was one of three people on the call for the 35-car race from a studio in Charlotte. The inaugural event drew more than 900,000 viewers, making it the highest-rated esports television program in history.

“NASCAR’s transition [to esports] has been the most intriguing.”

On Sunday, Timmy Hill, a 27-year-old pro driver who has never won a NASCAR Cup Series race, won the second virtual race at Texas Motor Speedway.

NASCAR chief digital officer Tim Clark said the plan is to continue staging virtual versions of its races, following the usual schedule, until its season resumes. As it stands, the on-track season is suspended until May 9.

For its part, the League of Legends Championship Series confronted the coronavirus outbreak like traditional sports leagues, realizing quickly that continuing as usual was irresponsible.

A day after announcing plans to proceed without a studio audience, media and non-essential personnel, the league on March 13 postponed that weekend’s competition entirely. Four days later, the league announced it was going remote for the foreseeable future.

Greeley, the commissioner, said the decision was not easy. In-person events not only make for better entertainment, but better competition. Playing remotely could lead to slower connections, which impacts gameplay. And players are less supervised, opening opportunities for cheating. The league spent the next week devising a plan to limit network issues and rule-breaking.

League of Legends players take part in a live streaming event in Montpellier, France, in September.

On Wednesday, LCS announced the rest of the season, including the finals, which originally were scheduled to be held in a 12,000-seat stadium at the Dallas Cowboys’ practice facility in Frisco, Texas, April 18-19, would take place online.

“We can play from home,” said Steve Arhancet, co-owner and CEO of Team Liquid, the reigning LCS champions. “That makes us a much more resilient entertainment industry when it comes to competitive sports.”

The 10-team LCS returned from its one-week postponement with five matches. The battles comprised Week 8 of the competition’s spring split. A team named Cloud 9 won both of its matches, improving its league-best record in the march toward a $200,000 prize pool to supplement player salaries that average more than $300,000.

::

The four neat rectangles were back on my television after the final match on March 22. The host, in the top left, thanked everyone who made the event possible. He implored the audience for feedback to improve. They were poised to return the next weekend. After another week without sports, I was too.

By Jorge Castil
March 29, 2020

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For more information about Contender eSports, check out our FAQs.

Fox Sports to televise live Madden NFL 20 esports tournament

Is this esports’ time to shine?

The big picture: Fox Sports on Sunday will air the first-ever Madden NFL Invitational tournament later today on FS1. The two-hour event, to be hosted by Chris Myers and Rachel Bonnetta, will raise awareness for the CDC Foundation’s Covid-19 relief efforts, the network said. Could this be the jumping-off point that esports needs to go mainstream?

Had you told the programming directors at major broadcasters like ESPN and Fox Sports just one month ago that there would essentially be no live sports to air come the end of March, they would have laughed you right out of the room. Yet, here we are.

The NBA and NHL have canceled their seasons. The NCAA basketball tournament was canceled. NASCAR has postponed races through May 3. MLB has postponed the start of its season. Major boxing and MMA events have been called off. Even the Olympics have been pushed back a year.

Contender eSports 405 N Jefferson Ave Springfield, MO 65806

Fox Sports said the esports tournament will consist of seven matches across three rounds of play to determine a winner among a field of celebrity competitors including Derwin James, Antonio Cromartie, Michael Vick, Matt Leinart, Orlando Scandrick, T.J.Houshmandzadeh, Juju Smith-Schuster, and Ahman Green. All players will compete remotely with the matches streamed live during the telecast.

Yeah, it’s essentially Twitch, but on cable TV.

Sure, it’s unusual, but what other option does the broadcaster have? It’s not like there’s a contingency plan in place for this sort of scenario and Fox Sports likely doesn’t have the massive archive of old sporting events to fill open programming slots that ESPN does. The only option, it would seem, is to think outside the box and that’s what we’re seeing play out.

WWE, for example, is still pumping out content, albeit in empty arenas (and yes, it’s just as bizarre and uncomfortable as it sounds). The UFC is still attempting to put on its mega-fight between Khabib Nurmagomedov and Tony Ferguson on April 18, a bout that is seemingly cursed as it has been scheduled and canceled four times already.

For Fox and especially esports in general, however, this is a huge opportunity. Last week’s virtual NASCAR race drew impressive numbers and today’s football broadcast could easily top that. And to think, it wasn’t all that long ago when ESPN’s president proclaimed that esports were not real sports.

Fox Sports’ Madden NFL 20 Invitational is scheduled to kick off at 7:00 Eastern on FS1.

By Shawn Knight
March 29, 2020

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