Esports offer fans alternate entertainment

As the coronavirus situation continues to evolve, ripple effects have caused mass cancellations throughout the sports and entertainment world. This opens the door for alternative forms of media to enter into the viewing spectrum.

In recent weeks, major sports, including NBA, NHL, MLB, and MLS, suspended their seasons. With the questions concerning the months ahead, it remains uncertain when and if these leagues can continue.

With social distancing recommendations coming from government officials, avid sports fans are found with more time on their hands and nothing to watch. However, various nontraditional sports leagues have continued action due to the versatility of their structures.

The most prominent of which is esports, competitive gaming leagues revolving around strategic teamwork within the industry’s most popular titles and real-life simulations.

Brett Payne, the owner of Contender eSports, an esports gaming center franchise based in Springfield, said transitioning during this time of isolation has been difficult for all businesses; however, it is “one that is much smoother for the esports world.”

“Everyone has been seeing events get canceled,” Payne said. “However, with the capability for players to compete together online from remote locations, we have been able to continue on with our events — just in a modified format.”

Contender holds events nightly, which are now strictly online. Audiences can view competitions through services such as Twitch and Facebook Live.

“Typically, we don’t stream events in order to encourage people to come in to watch live and meet others,” Payne said. “Given the circumstances, online live streaming services allow us to continue to hold our events and give people access to view them.”

Payne said he believes the ability to continue pushing out content online right now is key to potentially increasing esports viewership over the next few months.

A problem with online competitions is when players are on their own personal internet connections, slow internet speeds can cause “lag input,” where the player’s poor connection causes the game to run less smoothly. Sometimes this can result in players being disconnected from games.

Jesse Skaggs, a former professional Halo player, now runs Contender’s online streams and said he believes he’s seen an increase in audience participation over the last few weeks, despite Contender’s actual game floor closing.

“Viewership is up but not with competitive play,” Skaggs said. “Many mainstream gamers such as Ninja (Tyler Blevins) have seen jumps in viewership because young audiences simply have more free time right now.”

Skaggs said a perfect example of esports gaining interest is the “eNASCAR” virtual race which was run on Sunday. Racers competed in a virtual simulation of a race at the Homestead-Miami racetrack. Denny Hamlin, a professional NASCAR driver, won the race.

“It is a full-on racing experience that is highly accurate to the real thing,” Skaggs said.

Skaggs said with this format, NASCAR was still able to produce a race while avoiding crowds — and probably did so at a much lower production cost than it took to host an actual race.

Skaggs said he doesn’t think esports is going to take over traditional sports anytime soon, but said: “The industry is rapidly growing and now is a good time, with everything going on, for new viewers to be introduced to what (esports) has to offer.”

By Noah Tucker, Sports Reporter, The Standard
March 24, 2020

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Springfield eSports Arcade Offers Unique Opportunity

A little trash talk and razor-sharp focus. It sure seems a lot like sports.

“You’ve got football, you’ve got tennis, you’ve got baseball, you’ve got basketball. With eSports, we have League of Legends, we have [Super] Smash [Bros], we have Apex [Legends], we have FIFA,” said Contender eSports CEO and Founder Brett Payne.

A rapidly growing industry, eSports is competitive video-gaming and the passion that comes with it.

“You can’t imagine the number of people playing and yelling and screaming and cheering,” Payne said.

He saw that passion and decided to found Contender eSports.

Contender eSports Springfield

Springfield arcade manager Jesse Skaggs says it’s the perfect place for gamers in the Ozarks to share their competitive spirit.

“Not everybody can afford a computer like this at home to have that opportunity,” Skaggs said.

Just like a traditional sports venue, Contender eSports in Springfield is now closed to the public, but unlike a basketball gym or a baseball field, closing the doors doesn’t mean the action stops.

“We’re approaching this as a new grand opening,” Payne said. “We are doubling down on our marketing, on our efforts and working with people. This is not a slow time for us at all.”

Instead, the ongoing pandemic forcing people to stay home is driving them online.

“We’re actually seeing growth in that aspect,” Skaggs said. “Because you don’t have to show up. That’s problem number one.”

Skaggs, a former professional Halo player, also played college baseball at Southwest Baptist University.

He often hosts Contender customers on Twitch, a live streaming platform that’s helped eSports explode around the globe.

“When I was 18, I had to make the choice between college baseball and pursuing competitive gaming… If I would’ve known eight years down the road [playing Halo] there’s going to be 44 million people watching me play a pro video game that I was competitive at, I probably would’ve opted out of the college baseball option then,” Skaggs said.

He says as you learn about pro gaming, you notice the similarities between that and professional sports.

“[Pro gamers] have nutrition plans, they have weight lifting plans,” Skaggs said. Yeah, they’re sitting behind a screen for 12 hours in a day, but in the other six, they’re literally training themselves to be able to do that for 12 hours.”

Even those dedicated professionals started out as beginners.

“It’s cool to be able to give the opportunity of what it is now, that’s my biggest thing of doing this as a career is now I can be like ‘hey, this is an option for you’,” Skaggs said.

Just maybe, it’ll click for Springfield’s next professional gamer.

By Mark Spillane
March 25, 2020

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Local eSports leaders to create a league for high schoolers

SPRINGFIELD, Mo- Contender eSports, and the Drury eSports team are squading up to create a league for high schoolers in Springfield.

Contender eSports is Springfield’s only eSports gaming center. Brett Payne owns the Springfield location and the franchise nationwide, with the corporate office in Springfield at the Missouri State eFactory.

Brett started the company towards the end of 2018 and wanted it to be a place for the community to come and enjoy it.

Brett Payne, Founder and CEO – Contender eSports

“There was an opportunity for us to kind of standardize this and make sure that we have a way for every city in the United States to have its own brick and mortar esports facility,” says Brett.

Brett is no stranger to video games. He has four kids ranging from 27 to 6-years-old. So he understands the parental perspective with kids and video games.

He says since the gaming center has opened, it opened last week, parents are shocked with how family-friendly of a place it is.

“They come in here; they see so many people while they’re playing. They sit on the couches, they talk with their other friends. They know that this is a very family-friendly place, so we try to make it really really safe for everybody,” says Brett.

The mission of Contender is to reach gamers of all ages. To reach high school students, they are creating gaming leagues for high schoolers in Springfield.

Contender and the Drury eSports team are hoping to create the league in the coming weeks.

“We’re working together to start the first Springfield eSports high school league. So parents that have been arguing with their kids about playing various games all of a sudden are going to see those kids competing against other high schools here,” says Brett.

Esports: nothing but (inter)net for a group of Drury athletes Drury eSports Head Coach

Michael Jones says Drury’s role is to coach the students on teamwork.

“We’re offering the expertise in how do you run a team? What are the duties of a couch? There’s a lot of teachers and faculty members that are stepping up that are seeing this as something their students are passionate about, and they want to support that. So we’re volunteering to offer mentorship and coaching to these young gamers so that they can learn how to be part of a team,” says Michael.

Until the leagues are set in stone, high schoolers are still welcome to play with friends at Contender.

In more eSports news, Drury will be hosting an eSports festival at the O’Reilly Family Event Center on February 22nd and 23rd.

According to a press release from Drury, “Teams in the Midwest Esports Conference will hold official competitions in a double, round-robin regular season in the game League of Legends. In addition to spectating the conference’s League of Legends contests, attendees can sign up for tournaments in a variety of games.”

By Chris Six
Feb 10, 2020 / 06:25 PM CST / Updated: Feb 10, 2020 / 06:27 PM CST

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For serious esports players, it’s more than video games

For 17-year-old Martín Trejo, playing video games isn’t a solitary activity.

Quite the opposite, actually.

For him, gaming connects people and makes the world a little smaller.

Like when he left friends behind in Mexico, where he grew up, and kept in touch by gaming with them from another country.

“Let’s say you’re on a regular sports team. Your friend moves out of the city. You can’t play with them anymore. But if you’re playing games, you’re still able to,” the senior said.

The community aspect of gaming is part of what drew him to join the esports team – a competitive video gaming group – at Del Norte High School.

“Something that made me interested is that I can meet new people. All these people are in different grades than me,” he said, gesturing around the room at his teammates playing the Nintendo Switch.

Trejo, captain of a multi-player online battle arena team, recently became one of the first esports scholarship recipients at Albuquerque Public Schools.

The scholarships cover season fees and the cost of a team jersey.

“I didn’t think that was going to be a resource,” Trejo said.

The first batch was awarded this month to 55 high school students, according to APS.

Chief information and strategy officer Richard Bowman, who was a driver in bringing esports districtwide, said the scholarships were a way to make joining a team possible.

“We did not want a lack of means to become a problem in accessing esports,” he said.

Bowman said esports is a growing industry that can open doors, such as college, for APS students.

“I think it’s important to give the opportunity to all the different types of kids at school. Esports is a big and growing opportunity, and APS should be a leader in it,” he said.

As of Friday, 32 more students were slated to receive scholarships, for a total of 87, according to esports project supervisor Laurie Lehman.

An APS Education Foundation grant and donations are used to fund the scholarships.

Vy Nguyen, 17, is one recipient.

The League of Legends team captain joined the Del Norte esports team a couple of months ago because she wanted to have a group she could play with consistently.

She said that in addition to becoming a better gamer, being on the team has taught her communication skills and patience.

“It’s important to get along with your team and understand each other,” she said.

As the only girl on the team, she hopes to see the program expand with more diverse members.

“The boys are nice. They’re really cool, but I do wish there were more girls,” the junior said. “So, I hope me being in the esports team will convince other girls to join.”

Esports – a New Mexico Activities Association-approved activity – officially started in APS in the 2018-19 school year and is offered to high school students.

Joshua Martinez, APS esports coordinator, said the NMAA picks the games, avoiding anything violent or inappropriate, and schools compete throughout the season.

Martinez said 19 high schools are participating in esports across APS, up from around eight schools that participated last year.

While gaming can be a fanciful escape into another universe, it’s not just fun and – well – games.

Trejo said esports has helped his skills in leadership, communication, problem solving and teamwork.

“It makes me feel like I’ve become a better person,” he said.

By SHELBY PEREA / JOURNAL STAFF WRITER
PUBLISHED DECEMBER 25, 2019

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Music Industry: How Esports will be the next contender

Inaugural track Music and Sports by Midem, scheduled to take place on June 6 and created by the sister company of Midem’s Esports BAR, is the only venue where people will be able to know how and why these two industries come together to play a key role in the future.

With some of the biggest gambling-giants like Bet365 and Betway esports offering odds on esports games, it’s clearly evident that the Esports industry is going to grow massively.

Executives and musicians from the fields of music and esports will share their knowledge and how this partnership will affect pop culture in the future.

“This Midem event is the only one designed to create a dialogue with esports professionals, as music is becoming important for sports production,” says Stephane Gambetta, Production Manager Esports BAR.

Digital entertainment is possibly one of the first entertainment platforms that attract the interest of major press and marketers for the uninitiated music industry.

There is a generation that enjoys watching gamers play online, on TV and at venues. Digital natives of Gen Z and the Millennials are a core part of the esports fan base including sports teams playing on streaming platforms, broadcasting Television and live venues.

Now, millions of watchers battle each other on live streaming sites including Twitch, a tech giant subsidiary Amazon.com. Yet gamers and esports enthusiasts using streaming platforms have become superstars with millions of followers running their own online esports tourneys.

Supporters communicate with them in real-time with feverish feedback within the chat region of the computer. Some use micro-trading to make donations, which can make millions of dollars from players organizing gaming tournaments.

The Newzoo research firm forecasts that in 2019 esports are expected to hit 450 million more viewers and the maximum profit of $1 billion. And while this is a small sum compared to the global music industry, a value of $19.1 billion, esports also attract fans in the music industry.

Therefore, innovation in esports from diverse technology, entertainment and commercial groups putting together Esports BAR is making this new phenomenon more formal.

And now, Midem so Esports BAR together want to bring music producers, record labels, retailers and holders of rights to a new yet rapidly growing media ecosystem.

“Rock and fans ‘ experiences are very different,” Gambetta says. Live esports events, comparable to music festivals, are high-performance audio-visual activities. There is also new audiovisual material surrounding music created in the sports industry. “Midem is a great forum for businesses to gather and publish information and understand that music plays an important role in esports,” says Pieter van Rijn, CEO of FUGA Digital Music Distribution Company.

How Esports Betting Affects the Industry

There appears to be a big market that is here to stay, not just the new gambling phenomenon. There are many reasons for the rise of eSports gambling. Second, it’s only natural for people who are in eSports, who want to pay for their expertise while attending eSports games.

ESports are very colorful, there are many surprises and in minutes things can change. This is why e-Sports betting can prove lucrative, but also very thrilling. If you wager on it, watching a match will be much more interesting than watching without gambling.

ESports games are broadcast online live, and usually free to view, making things much easier for viewers and punters in eSports. Millions of people are watching eSports, competitions are competitive, the game is broken into integral parts like maps and maps and other information like kills are registered and it is easy to see why eSports, close to traditional sports, is ideal for gambling.

Betting on eSports became widely known soon after eSports, at least as competitive games, if not as athletics. Yet eSports betting didn’t appear to become so popular, and certainly didn’t seem to be recognized and began offering eSports betting.

There were several reasons to doubt whether eSports gambling would become a major feature.

Next, eSports themselves are extremely uncontrolled and the players fatigued game cheating and other risks. In comparison, eSports primarily targeted teenagers and young adults, which means that the highest proportion of the target population was less than 18.

Skin gambling seemed to be the most prevalent form of eSports betting and real money betting would be limited to wagering among friends and a small number of somewhat depressing online sites. Yet things have changed, and quite rapidly they have changed.

Drake, Lopez and Steve Aoki investing in Esports

In order to reach a wider audience, Games developer Riot Games has approached FUGA to sell the songs to an audience broader, hosting high-performing competitions focused on its game of League of Legends (LoL) and creating in-house music.

In South Korea, last year’s opening ceremony of the Riot games championship event was the K / DA K-pop group live music, followed by the LoL characters ‘ Augmented Reality models, which chanted POP / STARS from Riot Games.

Riot Games wants the help of a marketing company such as FUGA to distribute this product to mainstream music fans.

ENTER Records, which is a joint-venture company with the ESL sports group, established major labels with Universal Music Group (UMG). The FatRat, which has increased its fan base of music available for esports entertainment, has already been included in ENTER Music. German electronic music is now available.

“We find out that the average player can spend up to 10 hours listening to Music.” Dirk Baur, CEO of Universal Music Labs Germany at a recent Esports BAR Conference in Cannes: “We have found that FatRat is a good example of how we use music at events; it provides added value for the way we do.” As Twitch streamed Drake online, a player himself, last year, Tyler Ninja Blevin broke most records.

Consumers of esports “are among the most technologically integrated and not reachable by other means,” says Gambetta, adding: “Sports are a promotional platform that allows its highly-touched audiences to perform music. We are happy to be able to put together the two industries.

By RJ Frometa
PUBLISHED NOVEMBER 11, 2019

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All the questions about ‘Fortnite’ you were too embarrassed to ask

Atlanta (CNN Business)”Fortnite” is big business and an unlikely cultural phenomenon that is sweeping the globe.

The multiplayer video game, about an impending ecological crisis threatening the survival of humanity, is about to have its Super Bowl.

The Fortnite World Cup finals will take place at Arthur Ashe tennis stadium in Queens, New York this weekend. Players from all over the world have flown to the Big Apple and will compete over a $30 million prize pool.

If you’re not among the millions of people playing “Fortnite” and are feeling left behind, we break down everything you need to know.

Let’s start with the basics. What the heck is this game?

“Fortnite” is essentially a crossover between “The Hunger Games” (a post-apocalypse battle) and “Minecraft” (a creative sandbox where players can build anything they like). You can play it on Xbox, PlayStation, Windows and Mac platforms

There are two versions: “Fortnite: Save the World,” which has players banding together to fight off zombie-like monsters who drop from storm clouds, and its free (and more popular) spinoff, “Fortnite Battle Royale,” which pits up to 100 players against each other in a frenzied fight for survival. Last one standing wins.

‘Hunger Games?’ Monsters?? This game sounds violent

“Fortnite” is rated T for Teen, which means suitable for ages 13 and up. It certainly contains violence, but its animation is cartoon-like and there’s no blood or gore.

The Entertainment Software Rating Board explains its parental guidance this way: “This is an action game in which players build forts, gather resources, craft weapons and battle hordes of monsters in frenetic combat … players use guns, swords, and grenades … (and) can also defeat enemies by using various traps (e.g., electric, spikes, poisonous gas). Battles are highlighted by frequent gunfire, explosions, and cries of pain.”

Contender eSports 405 N Jefferson Ave Springfield, MO 65806

Some parents have complained about the game. But while the objective is to kill all of your opponents, “Fortnite” is nowhere near as violent as games like “Call of Duty” or “Grand Theft Auto.”

What makes it so popular?

One driving factor behind “Fortnite’s” popularity is its cost, or lack thereof. Because the “Battle Royale” version is entirely free and accessible on a number of platforms, it has a low barrier to entry — allowing new players to quickly acclimate and feel accomplished.

The developers of the game are attuned to its popularity and release updates weekly with new items and actions.

Players also compete on Twitch, an Amazon-owned live streaming site for gamers, and now on the Nintendo Switch (although they’re still working out the bugs on this platform).

The game’s spontaneity and cartoonish glee make it highly accessible. But “Fortnite” also has a high-skill ceiling, keeping players hooked and eager to improve.

Contender eSports 405 N Jefferson Ave Springfield, MO 65806

How is this game making any money if it’s free?

The original version of “Fortnite” costs $40, and a deluxe version is $60. But it mostly turns a profit from its in-game currency, V-bucks.

“Fortnite” generates most of its money from in-game purchases.

Players spend real money to acquire V-bucks, which can be used to buy customizable aspects of the game such as tools, weapons, outfits and even emotes.

Slow down — what’s an emote?

Emotes are dances or gestures that characters can do in the game. They are one of the most popular aspects of “Fortnite” and have generated hundreds of memes.

Popular emotes include the Floss dance, Carlton’s “Fresh Prince of Bel Air” dance and the Take the L dance, in which a player makes an L on their forehead while kicking, donkey-like, from side to side.

Is it a passing fad, or is ‘Fortnite’ here to stay?

“Fortnite” remains the biggest video game in esports, although it is starting to lose momentum. That’s why, in a bid to remain popular, Epic Games is throwing its giant Fortnite sporting event this weekend. Fans of the game range from 13-year-old boys to 30-something gamers.

The game is also popular with celebrities. Rappers Drake and Travis Scott, NFL player JuJu Smith-Schuster and popular Twitch gamer Ninja all competed on a Twitch livestream of the game and broke the site’s record for concurrent viewers.

Contender eSports 405 N Jefferson Ave Springfield, MO 65806

Other famous fans of the game include Joe Jonas, Chance the Rapper and Norm MacDonald.

By Josh Axelrod and Saeed Ahmed, CNN Business
PUBLISHED JULY 26, 2019

— Editor’s note: An earlier version of this article was published June 17, 2018.
CNN’s Brandon Griggs contributed to this story.

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Five reasons why Mercedes-Benz is involved with eSports

Mercedes-Benz and eSports — isn’t that a contradiction? On the one side there’s a brand that even today is often regarded as conservative, has a tradition going back 130 years, and is associated with motorsports. On the other side is a sport whose players and fans used to be mocked as “nerds” and nowadays get excited about fantasy role-playing and “cosplay” (costume play, a performance art whose participants wear costumes representing their favorite fantasy characters — see below).

Outsiders would probably not even mention Mercedes-Benz and eSports in the same breath. Nonetheless, we have been one of the pioneers sponsoring eSports since 2017. At first glance, our partnership seems to be a mismatch — but in fact we fit together very well! In this blog post I’d like to take you with me into the world of virtual sports.

ESL One was held in Birmingham in early June. And Mercedes-Benz was in the midst of it! A big Mercedes EQC star shined brightly above the stage. The audience joined the jury in the vote for the “Mercedes-Benz MVP” — the Most Valuable Player in the tournament. People could play games inside a “Mercedes-Benz In-Car-Gaming CLA,” and there are many similar highlights.

Contender eSports 405 N Jefferson Ave Springfield, MO 65806

We want to communicate authentically in the world of eSports, and that’s why we’ve expanded our activities as a partner of ESL. In addition to its already existing premium partnership with ESL, Mercedes-Benz is now also the event’s exclusive and global mobility partner.

Contender eSports 405 N Jefferson Ave Springfield, MO 65806

That’s kind of cool — but you might still be wondering WHY Mercedes-Benz is involved in eSports. Here are five reasons why:

1. Because eSports are definitely sports

We’ve already explained the Top 3 misunderstandings about eSports. In our opinion, the argument that eSports participants are not real athletes is not justified. The cognitive demands and strains of eSports have been sufficiently documented, and the players’ physical fitness is becoming increasingly important.

Independently of the sports-science perspective, eSports are also sports that should be taken seriously from a marketing standpoint. “Event eSports” such as ESL One function exactly like “traditional” sports! Thomas Müller from the Bayern Munich soccer team is known as a star with rough edges — and in exactly the same way, there are also well-known faces in the eSports scene. The Birmingham Arena, which will be filled with 15,800 spectators in T-shirts representing their favorite teams, is completely sold out. Millions of spectators will also be streaming the matches, complete with live commentary, on their mobile terminals. The arenas, the stars, the fans, the playing field — from a marketing standpoint, there are clear parallels between “traditional” sports and eSports.

Contender eSports 405 N Jefferson Ave Springfield, MO 65806

2. Because eSports are a growing market

The eSports market is growing by leaps and bounds. The financial forecasts for the years ahead are tripping over themselves with superlatives, no matter what specialist report you’re reading. A current article in the sport business magazine SPONSORs predicts that in 2019 the revenues from global eSports will pass the US$1 billion threshold for the first time — and this figure is due to increase.

So it’s fantastic that in this market Mercedes-Benz is perceived as one of the pioneers of “non-endemic” eSports sponsorship. “Non-endemic” refers to companies and their products that are not directly part of the eSports scene — by contrast, endemic sponsors would include video game or electronic hardware producers. By comparison with its direct automotive competitors, Mercedes-Benz is clearly in the lead when it comes to eSports sponsorship. From a global perspective, many major corporate groups such as McDonald’s and Coca-Cola are investing in eSports. Why are they doing that?

Contender eSports 405 N Jefferson Ave Springfield, MO 65806

3. Because eSports reach a future-oriented, attractive target group

Through eSports it’s possible to reach a special young target group that does not exist in “traditional” sport sponsorships in this configuration and in these dimensions. Let’s take a closer look at this target group. The core of this community consists of highly educated millennials.

85% of the core target group is between the ages of 18 and 34. An above-average proportion of the core target group is firmly established in a career and has a high level of purchasing power. In addition, the target group is strikingly tech-savvy. That’s why this community is especially interesting for us as an automaker.

Establishing contact with the members of this target group as early as possible and providing them with a positive experience of the Mercedes-Benz brand can tip the scales later on, when an individual is deciding whether to buy a car from Mercedes-Benz or a competing brand. In other words, the goal of our sponsorship has been designed with the long term in mind. In particular, the future-oriented themes of mobility that are relevant for us, such as carsharing and autonomous driving, are central topics to which the community is more receptive than the average consumer.

Contender eSports 405 N Jefferson Ave Springfield, MO 65806

4. Because eSports have impressive reach figures

From a global perspective, eSports have long been more than just a youth-related phenomenon. In 2017, 81 million people all over the world were playing that year’s most popular game, the League of Legends (LoL) — that’s a far greater number than the population of France (67 million). In 2018, 17.7 million spectators watched the NBA basketball finals. The peak number of online spectators of the LoL championships in 2018 was 205 million fans! And if we compare the Facebook followers of VfB Stuttgart (547,000) with those of the eSports team “Fnatic” (2.5 million), here too the numbers speak for themselves. eSports have a much higher profile in North America and Asia than they do in Europe. At the end of last year, China built a whole “eSports City” from scratch in Hangzhou. It cost €254 million and covers an area the size of 68 soccer fields. China plans to invest an additional €2 billion in this facility between now and 2022. And there are further impressive figures concerning eSports, thanks to their diversity.

Contender eSports 405 N Jefferson Ave Springfield, MO 65806

5. Because eSports have a positive effect on the image of Mercedes-Benz

From a global perspective, Mercedes-Benz benefits from its involvement in an attractive and unique environment. The brand’s image looks fresher and more modern thanks to its close links with the eSports community. The fans, stars, and organizers of this global scene are younger and more closely connected with one another than those of any other sport.

The key to this closeness is the fast communication that the Internet makes possible. Because of the high degree of interaction within the community, sponsors are noticed quickly. They receive direct feedback on platforms such as Twitch and Reddit — platforms that are difficult to penetrate otherwise. Most importantly, the Mercedes-Benz brand strictly distances itself from ego-shooter games and other games that propagate or glorify violence!

Contender eSports 405 N Jefferson Ave Springfield, MO 65806

What are the next steps?

In the Mercedes-Benz sport sponsorship portfolio, eSports are a logical complement to sports such as golf and Formula 1 auto racing. Sponsors are tapping into a young, attractive, and tech-savvy target group that other sports cannot offer — and that’s why companies are investing in this sport. At Mercedes-Benz, our involvement with this up-and-coming sport is by no means over. We have expanded our cooperation with ESL. This year we’ve already been in Katowice, Poland and Mumbai, and now we’re in Birmingham. In October we’ve got a “home game” at ESL One in Hamburg. And our agenda for next year will once again include four major events and dozens of tournaments in the Mercedes-Benz markets. So stay online!

Contender eSports 405 N Jefferson Ave Springfield, MO 65806

by Manuel Müller
PUBLISHED May 31, 2019

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What Side of History Will You Choose?

What Side of History Will You Choose

Is this a good time to enter the eSports industry? That question is either yes or no. History will prove that the decisions people make today are decisions on which side of this line in history they want to be on.

I get asked this questions maybe two or three times a week, “Do you have any concerns about entering into the eSports industry”? And the answer is, No. As a matter of fact, it’s “No . . .” Check out this video to find out why.

What Side of History Will You Choose?

(Transcript) I get asked this questions maybe two or three times a week, “Do you have any concerns about entering into the eSports industry?” And the answer is, No. As a matter of fact, it’s “No . . . “ And the reasons why is just because it’s a one word answer. It’s a binary question and the answer it either Yes or No. And the answer is no because really, the decision I had to make was, “What side of history do I want to be on?” That was it. So I know that this is a defining moment . I know a lot of people don’t understand it. You know what? 1988 and 1989 and 1990, people didn’t understand the internet and now it completely controls everything in your life. It was a binary decision back then too.

Are you going to go all in or are you not going to believe it at all and believe it’s a fad? It’s “What side of history do you want to be on?” So I just want to encourage you if you’re trying to get the answer to that question. Sometimes people talk to me and they want me to convince them of what they should decide. I’m not going to try to convince you. As a matter of fact, I told my colleagues this week, “I don’t want you to spend one minute trying to convince anyone of this. Not one minute.”

People have to decide for theirselves what side of history they want to be on. And I want to encourage you to make that decision too.

If you’re interested in learning more about opening a Contender eSports franchise, Contact Us at any time.

The Big Three Questions of Opening an eSports Gaming Center

The Big Three Questions of Opening an eSports Gaming Center

When considering opening a gaming center, people often visit several locations as they research the pros and cons of an independent location vs a franchise. It is not uncommon to notice at many independent locations that there are a bunch of computers sitting around with wires all over the place, that the place is almost always empty and that the owners look downtrodden.

In the video below, I compare an independent hamburger restaurant (Taylor’s Hamburgers) to the McDonald’s franchise.

The Three Big Questions

At Taylor’s Hamburgers I noticed that it’s small, there’s no branding anywhere, there’s no training anywhere. . . good hamburgers, good people, but that’s about it. However, there are many McDonald’s locations surrounding Taylor’s. What McDonald’s did was they looked at an opportunity where individuals were passionate about a certain thing, in this case, hamburgers and they took their passion and turned it into a business and they were happy with that. There was nothing more to it. Ray Kroc and not necessarily the McDonald brothers, but particularly Ray Kroc looked at that opportunity and said, “Look. . . If we take this thing that people do love (the do love it), there’s a huge audience for this, there’s a huge consumer base for it and we apply standards, branding, structures and training . . .”

Have you ever seen the movie “The Founder”? You should watch it, because you’ll see the process that someone goes through to take something that is loved by people and to standardize it in order to expand and grow it throughout an industry or throughout a country.

Visiting one or two single hamburger restaurants is not a proof of concept. If you want to be part of a franchise, you can’t use independent locations as a proof of concept. You have to look at the industry, see what’s happening and see if you can capture it. You have to ask yourself:

  1. Can I get a better location?
  2. Will I provide a better service or product?” It doesn’t matter what franchise it is, these rules apply to everything.
  3. Can I be a better operator? i.e Can I execute better on marketing, on customer service, on managing building the brand, on PR?

It doesn’t matter what franchise it is, these rules apply to every industry.

We hope this is helpful to you. Honestly, it always comes down to the same three things; questions only you can answer. We hope that you’re able to do that.

If you’re interested in learning more about opening a Contender eSports franchise, Contact Us at any time.

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