eSports Joins the Big Leagues

With one of the fastest growing fan bases in pro sports, a youthful global audience that’s already larger than Major League Baseball’s and top players who are quickly joining the ranks of millionaires – eSports have entered the mainstream phenomenon.

Did you know?

  • The eSports monthly audience in 2018 has reached 167M and is predicted to reach 276M by 2022.
  • eSports rivals traditional pro sports. eSports viewership is already outpacing some major league sport audiences. Unlike traditional sports, most eSports viewership is online.
  • Who’s Watching? A young, digital and global audience.
  • Lucrative monetization opportunities arise as a result. Like traditional sports, media rights will eventually become the largest source of eSports revenue, followed by sponsorships.
  • Landmark media deals are taking shape. To date, there have been several landmark media rights deals.
  • Player earnings are surging. Growing prize pools are a key factor in audience growth and player earnings are beginning to resemble other pro sports.
  • Traditional pro sports are joining in. eSports keep fans engaged during the offseason. For developers, tournaments can further grow audiences, engagement, and monetization
  • There’s no stopping eSports. Audiences, prize pools and monetization opportunities will be growing rapidly over the next five years.

Watch what happens when a Goldman Sachs analyst plays with the pros. 

View the Infographic and read the full article by Goldman Sachs.

The Rise of eSports: How Big Can This Business Get?

LendEdu recently did a survey to evaluate changing spending habits as it relates to eSports. The findings are revealing in a sport that is emerging to the forefront of cultures in every country.

When we talk with potential franchisees about eSports, the first thing many of them say is “What is eSports?“. After a brief explanation, we typically hear back about a week later with the same response: “Ok, I have no idea how I have missed this .. but ever since we discussed eSports, I see it and hear it everywhere around me!”. That experience will fade away in the months and years to come, as the trends become as much a part of the culture as buying $5 coffees (i.e. remember the first time you walked into a Starbucks and said, “$2.95 for coffee! No one will ever pay that”). Yep… it’s the same thing.

Here are some findings

They surveyed 1,000 self-identified eSport fans, and they came away with the following key findings:

  • 62% of respondents indicated that they have spent money on eSports before, with the estimated average eSport expenditure coming in at $566 per year.
  • 49% of respondents would rather spend money on eSport event tickets instead of sporting or concert tickets. Further, 51% of respondents would rather spend money on eSport merchandise instead of sporting merchandise.
  • If they only could afford one, 45% of parents would rather pay for their child’s one-on-one video game lessons instead of sport or academic lessons.

Read the full article by Mike Brown at LendEdu.

League of Legends on TBS

Turner & IMG’s ELEAGUE, in partnership with Riot Games, will show League of Legends – the world’s most-played PC game – in a 1 Hour TBS special set to show Friday, Oct. 19, at 10 p.m. CST on TBS. ELEAGUE’s Esports 101: League of Legends will provide a lighthearted, easy to understand intro to League of Legends – the fast-paced, team-based strategy battle game with millions of gamers worldwide and with 14 professional leagues.

This is just another example of eSports taking center stage in media around the world. The growth is outstanding.

The show – co-hosted by League of Legends experts Bil “Jump” Carter & Kelsie “KayPea” Pelling – will celebrate the culture, history and in-game elements of the title’s global esports scene. ELEAGUE’s Esports 101: League of Legends will debut during the LoL World Championship 2018 (Sept. 22 through Nov. 3 in South Korea).

Read the full press release on ELeague.

Esports To Be A $1B Industry

Thanks to a number of factors, e-sports have erupted in popularity recently, with the total global audience expected to exceed 380 million by the end of this year, according to Newzoo, an Amsterdam-based research firm.

“It’s grown through a combination of expanded broadband, social networks, interesting games and personalities, more involvement from the publishers and also, increasingly, from sports and entertainment,” said Christopher Vollmer, global advisory leader for entertainment and media at PwC, the accounting firm formerly known as PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Online personalities helped in a significant way to bring this growth. In the United States and the UK, fans were about as likely to have been drawn to e-sports by online stars, such as those on YouTube, as they were by family and friends, according to a 2017 Nielsen report.

PwC expects the e-sports market to grow drastically, estimating that revenues will rise to $1.6 billion in 2020 from $620 million in 2017.

Continue Reading the original story in The New York Times.

Esports Boot Camps Growing Worldwide

The life of an esports player is the life of a true athlete: Train hard and train with the best to be your best.

NVidia has offered boot camps in their GeForce Esports studio in Silicon Valley since 2015 to do just that. And now they are offering similar boot camps in Munich and Shanghai (according to eSports Insider),  so more of their teams can prepare for esports tournaments.

The trend around the world is very much to support athletes preparing not only for individual achievement which could lead to financial winnings or university scholarships but also training for large tournaments and someday even the Olympics.

Yet, the training facilities are often not even available in key cities. This is just another reason why Contender eSports is uniquely positioned to meet this growing demand throughout the world. The facilities are first-class and provide the perfect environment for casual gaming, serious gaming, as well as intense training for large events.

Continue Reading the original story on The NVidia Blog.

Tutors Being Hired for Fortnite

Some parents have new dreams for their kids—make them Fortnite experts.

With more than 125 million players across the world, Fortnite’s immense popularity, which has drawn everyone from pre-teens to superstar musicians like Drake, has led to some parents hiring video game coaches to help their kids win.

Maria Bartiromo interviews coach, Cesar Sainz, who says that he has gained a significant number of clients as a result of the game’s popularity.  Gamer Sensei is the leading provider of coaching, and sessions are around $20 per hour.  Contender eSports is currently looking into partnerships with Gamer Sensei for coaching experiences at their upcoming locations around the world.

When the parent of one of Cesar’s students was asked why he sought after a coach, he noted that there are now universities offering scholarships for Fortnite.

Continue Reading the original story on FoxBusiness.com.

Fox Business: Esports hits Primetime

This past week Gamer World News host Rob Steinberg spoke about the growing popularity of esports. Fox Business is reporting a wave of growth around the world and particularly in the United States.

Stuart Varney started the segment by discussing the Overwatch championships, which drew 20,000 attendees at the Barclay Center in Brooklyn. A reported 300,000 watched online and it was aired by ESPN in primetime.

When asked how big this market is, Steinberg shook his head and stated, “Stuart, we are talking about a multi-billion dollar industry.” He went on to say that the gaming industry is now bigger than the movie industry and music industry combined.

Continue Reading the original story on FoxBusiness.com.

CNBC Sees Esports Market Booming

CNBC is reporting that the global esports industry is on fire and, now, some investors are getting excited about the industry.

The article highlighted Tim Seymour, co-founder and managing partner at Triogem Asset Management, a hedge fund, who was speaking on Fast Money on Monday.

Seymour pointed to the participation of large-scale media companies as proof of a growing industry: The Walt Disney Company broadcast the “Overwatch” games on ESPN.

“The fan base is rabid,” said Seymour, who is also a CNBC contributor. “The excitement is there. And it’s all demographics. It’s not just guys. It’s not just girls. It’s not just young folks. It’s old folks.

Continue Reading the original story on CNBC.com.

Esports in the 2024 Olympics

The possibility of video gaming as an Olympic sport was one of the topics explored in the Esports Forum held Friday in Switzerland.

The article notes that “an organization does not currently exist that represents esports globally and could align with the Olympic values, rules and regulations” which is why the bringing of esports to the Olympics was not “an immediate goal of the Esports Forum.” IOC Sports Director Kit McConnell commented on the overall goals of the meeting.

“There was a consensus that future collaboration will be based on ensuring that any activity supports and promotes the Olympic values; and while the goal was not to develop a pathway towards the inclusion of esports on the Olympic programme, we have a strong plan for ongoing dialogue and engagement, and are in a strong position to coordinate and support the wider engagement of the Olympic Movement with esports.” So what’s next for esports and the Olympics?

Naturally, as eSports gain mass appeal the draw for the general population to participate in local facilities providing the best experience is going to continue to grow. Contender eSports provides such facilities and is taking applications for future owners.

Continue Reading the original story on MSN.com.

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